Esther Amateau Pergament

Great Aunt Esther

August 22, 1914 – October 20, 2014
“Born on the Island of Rhodes the youngest of nine children, she immigrated to America in 1929. Educated, talented, and beautiful, she met her husband of 43 years in New York. On the day they met, Harvey was asked by his brother, “What do you think of the Spanish woman?” His reply, “She doesn’t know the time of day, but I’m going to marry her.” They married in 1942 and moved to Los Angeles in 1945, where they set up their home, and then proceeded to travel the world.
She is known by her extended family and friends for her traditional Sephardic cooking and hospitality.”
 
Esther will be remembered with tremendous love and affection for the joy she brought our family.
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Sephardic hospitality: why we make you snack with us

When a person shows up on the doorstep of a Sephardic home, they can be sure of one thing: if they cross the threshold, they will be made to eat. In our concept of hospitality is the notion that you feed everyone who comes to your home – even the unexpected visitor – and you get right to it. Dragging your heels to put out a snack is very bad form, as is a visitor’s refusing food when it’s offered. This means chances are you can’t pop over to a Sephardic home for just five minutes, but that’s soon forgiven. In my parents’ home, pretty much everyone who showed up at our door was greeted warmly and welcomed this way, which frankly was really nice. Continue reading

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Riff on a ram’s horn

Happy New Year!

Today I offer you an audiovisual mash up that’s best appreciated during this holiday. It’s brought to you by a biblical blast from a ram’s horn, and one of the musical heroes of my childhood. Continue reading

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Anyos munchos i buenos!

Wishing all a Sweet New Year… Shana Tova u’metuka!

 

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